randomness

inside the head of someone who wants to make a difference

griseus:

During their migration past Barrow, Alaska each spring, bowhead whales, (Balaena mysticetus), are remarkably vocal, producing

  • patterned sequences of complex sounds referred to as “songs”
  • exchange calls with other whales in a form of vocal interaction referred to as counter-calling
  • and repeated calls for an extended period of time or during counter-calling exchanges with other whales.

The illustration below shows a sound spectrogram of 13 calls, part of a bowhead whale “song,” recorded during the spring 2000 bowhead census. The lower-frequency calls (highlighted in pink) were made by a different bowhead whale and are not part of the “song.” The faint distant siren-like sounds (highlighted in green) were made by bearded seals, Erignathus barbatus

(via 0ceanspirit)

1 week ago - 210
wnderlst:

Aínsa, Spain | Victor Merino

wnderlst:

Aínsa, Spain | Victor Merino

eduardo-:

The most depressing part about what we do to sharks is that they have been here for about 420 million years (200 times longer than the Homo genus, and 2,100 times longer than H. sapiens sapiens), and we have nearly eradicated 141 of the 465 species IUCN recognises (209 of which are considered ‘data deficient’) in the last 50 years.

Let that sink in.

(via operationjaws)

nubbsgalore:

photos by matt smith from the Illawarra coast in new south wales of bluebottles, violet snails and blue dragons. 

despite its resemblance to the jellyfish, the bluebottle is more closely related to coral. known as a zooid, the bluebottle (or portugese man of war) is a colonial animal composed of many highly specialized and physiologically integrated individual organisms incapable of independent survival. 

the blue dragon — a type of nudibranch, here no larger than a thumbnail, with its own potent sting — is able to eat the nematocysts (stinging cells) of the bluebottle without discharging them and internally relocate them to the tips of each one of the fingers you can see in the pictures.

for their part, the violet snails also feed on the bluebottles.

notes matt, “despite their potentially dangerous sting, the bluebottle is an amazingly beautiful creature. with strong winds, hundreds of these cnidaria are blown into the bays around my home town and trapped overnight.”

this allows him to capture the above shots, which he creates with use of a fluorescent tube in his strobe light and a homemade waterproof lens dome.

(via operationjaws)

fashion-gallery:

Yes. Try again.

fashion-gallery:

Yes. Try again.

(via mygrowingedge)

So, the world is fine. We don’t have to save the world—the world is big enough to look after itself. What we have to be concerned about, is whether or not the world we live in, will be capable of sustaining us in it. That’s what we need to think about.

Douglas Adams (via observando)

wnderlst:

Aínsa, Spain | Victor Merino

wnderlst:

Aínsa, Spain | Victor Merino

griseus:

IF YOU BELIEVE SIZE MATTERS:  PALAU, A SMALL ISLAND IN PACIFIC IS ESTABLISHING A NON-FISHING ZONE THE SIZE OF FRANCE

In 2009, the island of Palau, located in the western Pacific Ocean just above New Guinea, established the first shark sanctuary in the world. Officials from the country say they’ve seen such success with the shark sanctuary as a buzzing tourist destination that they’ve launched plans to ban all commercial fishing in Palau’s large ocean territory by 2018.

The free fishing zone will span 630,000 square kilometres (240,000 square miles) - an area the size of France - and has been described as “unprecedented”.

The reason behind the no-fishing zone, according to the President of Palau Tommy Remengesau, was to allow the ocean to heal and replenish its populations of fish after decades of overfishing by commerical enterprises from around the world. 

Remengesau said Pacific island nations, which are also struggling to deal with climate change, were effectively “the conscience of the world" on environmental matters and had to lead by example because of their special connection with the ocean,” says Neil Sands for AFP.

The ocean is our way of life,” Remengesau told journalists. “It sustains and nurtures us, provides us with the basics of our Pacific island cultures, our very identities.”

Remengesau added that sharks offered more value to Palau as eco-tourism assets, saying that a 2011 study conducted by the Australian Institute of Marine Science concluded that a single reef shark could raise almost US$2 million for the local economy over 10 years thanks to the tourists that visit it. Figures put the tourism industry as being almost 30 times more lucrative to Palau than the commercial tuna industry. No attacks have ever occurred as the operators are careful to make sure everyone keeps a safe distance from the sharks.

We feel that a live shark is worth a thousand times more than a dead one,Remengesau said

griseus:

SYLVIA EARLE: MY WISH: PROTECT OUR OCEAN
Mrs Sylvia Earle (78) (TED Talk: My wish: Protect our oceans 2009) living legend is an oceanographer, explorer, author and lecturer with a deep commitment to research through personal exploration.  Has spent the past five decades exploring the seas. During that time she has seen a sharp decline in the number of ocean life and biodiversity - and a sharp increase in the number of oceanic dead zones and oil drilling sites.  
Netflix has an original doc Mission Blue on the life and work of Earle. you should see it.

Between 1950 and 2014, has died the half of coral reefs of the oceans (by multiple reasons)

Between 1950 and 2014, Pacific bluefin tuna, sharks and North Atlantic cod  were caught to near extinction.  Between 5% and 10% remain

Dead zones are hypoxic (low-oxygen) areas in the world’s oceans and large lakes, caused by “excessive nutrient pollution” from human activities coupled with other factors that deplete the oxygen required to support most marine life in bottom and near-bottom water. In 1975, there was ONE documented dead zone. In 2014, there are over 500.

Oil drilling in the Gulf Coast does not start and end with the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster of 2010 But the practice started more early than you think. In 1947, there was only one oil drilling site. In 2014, there are more than 30,000.
Photo by Mission Blue / Sylvia Earle
via Vista al Mar

griseus:

SYLVIA EARLE: MY WISH: PROTECT OUR OCEAN

Mrs Sylvia Earle (78) (TED Talk: My wish: Protect our oceans 2009) living legend is an oceanographer, explorer, author and lecturer with a deep commitment to research through personal exploration.  Has spent the past five decades exploring the seas. During that time she has seen a sharp decline in the number of ocean life and biodiversity - and a sharp increase in the number of oceanic dead zones and oil drilling sites.  

Netflix has an original doc Mission Blue on the life and work of Earle. you should see it.

Between 1950 and 2014, has died the half of coral reefs of the oceans (by multiple reasons)

Between 1950 and 2014, Pacific bluefin tuna, sharks and North Atlantic cod  were caught to near extinction.  Between 5% and 10% remain

Dead zones are hypoxic (low-oxygen) areas in the world’s oceans and large lakes, caused by “excessive nutrient pollution” from human activities coupled with other factors that deplete the oxygen required to support most marine life in bottom and near-bottom water. In 1975, there was ONE documented dead zone. In 2014, there are over 500.

Oil drilling in the Gulf Coast does not start and end with the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster of 2010 But the practice started more early than you think. In 1947, there was only one oil drilling site. In 2014, there are more than 30,000.

(via trynottodrown)

I knew I matured when I realized every situation doesn’t need a reaction. Sometimes you just have to leave people to continue to do the lame shit that they do.

(via cutely-perverted)

(Source: theeducatedqueen, via southern-mu)